An Active City is a Competitive City

Cities are competing in a global knowledge economy. 

With the greater mobility of business and labour, the personal choices and lifestyle preferences of highly skilled workers are increasingly important in order to compete. 

Employers are having to be much more strategic as they attempt to win over employees. Quality of life is one major factor. This involves not just how employers treat their staff and adapt their working environments, but also the broader lifestyle offer that can be accessed by employees based on their location. The quality of life that can be achieved is therefore growing significantly in terms of the impact it is having on the location decisions of business. 

Having experienced other parts of the UK throughout my career, I know that Bristol offers an attractive lifestyle. Recognised as the best place to live in the UK and as one of the UK’s core cities, it is no surprise then that in addition to the high-tech engineering companies, biosciences, and legal and financial services, the highly mobile and innovative creative and technology industries have also decided to base themselves here in the West. 

Whether that has been down to the environment on offer or the mindset and talent pool generated by our universities and businesses, we know we face challenges for the future if we are to maintain and advance our competitive position.  

Quality of life is key. Bristol is doing well for green spaces, walking and cycling (for those in the inner centre of the city), but less well on skills, schools and family living spaces, and falling down badly on high car use and poor supporting infrastructure. This is mainly down to a lack of decent joint working, short-sighted planning and poor delivery across the city and extended city-region. Transport is the obvious one – which the Mayor and others are working on – but equally housing, health and education are hugely important. 

An active city with great living and easy access to where you work must be our goal. 

If we get it right in Bristol over the next few years we can create the space, infrastructure and vibrancy we need to really thrive in a competitive future. This will enable us to attract more innovative businesses and individuals, and create the high value clusters in areas we have yet to imagine, creating a virtuous circle that will drive forward Bristol’s position and reputation on the global stage.   

Achieving this involves the city-region’s leaders, citizens and employers working together to plan and shape an attractive future. 

Business has a major role in creating this environment. Business must think big, bold and broad to secure success. They need use their position and influence for place shaping, to create the best environment for both living and working. 

If we can create an efficient, affordable, green and sustainable public transport infrastructure, and create great housing to complement the cycle ways and paths to encourage health and wellbeing and connect people to the place in which they live and work – the city-region will thrive. 

As Vice-Chancellor of one of the largest universities in the country, which is part of the Healthy Universities Group (actively engaged in researching and influencing how we can deliver a step change), I know the difference health and well-being makes at an institutional level. I also know the importance of the broader environment to our staff and in attracting and retaining the talent we need to succeed. 

We need to work together and show strong collective leadership to create a true and sustained advantage in an increasingly competitive global knowledge economy – to the benefit of business, families and individuals throughout the city-region.

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