An Active City is a Competitive City

Cities are competing in a global knowledge economy. 

With the greater mobility of business and labour, the personal choices and lifestyle preferences of highly skilled workers are increasingly important in order to compete. 

Employers are having to be much more strategic as they attempt to win over employees. Quality of life is one major factor. This involves not just how employers treat their staff and adapt their working environments, but also the broader lifestyle offer that can be accessed by employees based on their location. The quality of life that can be achieved is therefore growing significantly in terms of the impact it is having on the location decisions of business. 

Having experienced other parts of the UK throughout my career, I know that Bristol offers an attractive lifestyle. Recognised as the best place to live in the UK and as one of the UK’s core cities, it is no surprise then that in addition to the high-tech engineering companies, biosciences, and legal and financial services, the highly mobile and innovative creative and technology industries have also decided to base themselves here in the West. 

Whether that has been down to the environment on offer or the mindset and talent pool generated by our universities and businesses, we know we face challenges for the future if we are to maintain and advance our competitive position.  

Quality of life is key. Bristol is doing well for green spaces, walking and cycling (for those in the inner centre of the city), but less well on skills, schools and family living spaces, and falling down badly on high car use and poor supporting infrastructure. This is mainly down to a lack of decent joint working, short-sighted planning and poor delivery across the city and extended city-region. Transport is the obvious one – which the Mayor and others are working on – but equally housing, health and education are hugely important. 

An active city with great living and easy access to where you work must be our goal. 

If we get it right in Bristol over the next few years we can create the space, infrastructure and vibrancy we need to really thrive in a competitive future. This will enable us to attract more innovative businesses and individuals, and create the high value clusters in areas we have yet to imagine, creating a virtuous circle that will drive forward Bristol’s position and reputation on the global stage.   

Achieving this involves the city-region’s leaders, citizens and employers working together to plan and shape an attractive future. 

Business has a major role in creating this environment. Business must think big, bold and broad to secure success. They need use their position and influence for place shaping, to create the best environment for both living and working. 

If we can create an efficient, affordable, green and sustainable public transport infrastructure, and create great housing to complement the cycle ways and paths to encourage health and wellbeing and connect people to the place in which they live and work – the city-region will thrive. 

As Vice-Chancellor of one of the largest universities in the country, which is part of the Healthy Universities Group (actively engaged in researching and influencing how we can deliver a step change), I know the difference health and well-being makes at an institutional level. I also know the importance of the broader environment to our staff and in attracting and retaining the talent we need to succeed. 

We need to work together and show strong collective leadership to create a true and sustained advantage in an increasingly competitive global knowledge economy – to the benefit of business, families and individuals throughout the city-region.

Civic Leadership, Innovation and Economic Growth

With the run up to the General Election in May and the growing debate around devolution and cities, it was very timely to speak at the UUK Conference ‘Powering the Knowledge Economy: Universities, Cities and Innovation’ today.

We need to think broadly about how we power the knowledge economy and this is not simply limited to local economic growth. It is about much more, including public learning, civic spirit, and community-based innovation. It is also about businesses playing their role in education, community and society, and being part of, rather than outside, the civic and place-based leadership agendas.

I see a major part of my role and that of the University, as facilitating a joined up approach to problem-solving, so that we are really focusing on the key issues for the region and achieving the best outcomes, rather than simply viewing things through the lens or field in which we happen to work. The key issues of today and the future are highly complex – they cannot be addressed through one sector or sphere of society working alone.

We have some great examples of where this has really worked to bring about opportunities for the whole city-region, including the collaboration that won Bristol recognition as European Green Capital 2015. Bristol also won funding for one of the UK’s first four University Enterprise Zones, led by UWE Bristol and to be located on our Frenchay campus, which will support the next generation of companies in the areas of robotics, biosciences, biomedicine and other hi-tech areas. Both universities are also working very closely with businesses and the health sector on driving forward innovations on the assisted living agenda, diagnostics and telemedicine – particularly important for a society with an aging population and very relevant to all our lives.

This is all in addition, of course, to universities powering the knowledge economy through addressing skills shortages and providing learning opportunities that transform the futures of individuals, families, and communities. We know that 80% of new jobs will be in high-skill areas so access to opportunities and different pathways to higher skills is absolutely critical – involving collaboration across universities, educational providers, businesses, the public sector, community organisations and professional bodies.

Universities think and operate long term. They are also politically neutral and represent many sectors and sections of their locality and region. This makes them well placed to be anchors for their region – joining up across the various elements of a place, coordinating and developing the high-level opportunities and catalysts that will really shape the future. That was the focus of my speech today.

In the heated public policy debate ahead of the General Election it may be that university voices are more important than ever. Universities can and should shine a light on what is possible and lead the way by building the bridges, networks and capacity to deliver.

Higher Apprenticeships – the role of universities

The demand in our economy for high-level skills, to generate jobs and boost the UK’s global competitiveness, is in no doubt. We know that 80% of new jobs require skills at this level. This is well recognised by business leaders who are very clear about the real risk of major skills shortages across their sectors.

The question is do we have the right pathways to enable and inspire individuals to access and achieve these high-level skills?

As the recent McKinsey report, ‘Education to Employment‘, highlights, there is a lack of prestige and current ‘disorganisation’ associated with the vocational offer, across a variety of countries – not just the UK.

The economic and social imperative to address this is strong; and there is significant interest across the political parties and business organisations. Indeed, a recent article in the Economist has suggested this is leading to a ‘burst of innovation’ in vocational education.

Whilst it is great that we are applying our minds to this critical agenda, I would plea that we keep it simple and that we take a holistic approach – one that understands and maximises the value of the current offer. We need blended approaches, not separate and closed pathways, as we consider the best ways to meet the demand for high-level skills.

Today I was very pleased to speak at the Inside Government event on this topic, ‘The Future of Higher Apprenticeships 2014: Investing in Skills, Delivering Growth’, sharing our experiences in the development of Higher Apprenticeships at UWE Bristol. Higher Apprenticeships are certainly one of the ways we can work to meet the demand for high-level skills, albeit with a number of barriers to overcome, not least in terms of the investment needed from industry and challenges in terms of scalability and enabling SMEs to engage.

At UWE Bristol we have led on the development of Higher Apprenticeships in both Aerospace and Healthcare Science; as part of a successful £1.1m bid by the City of Bristol College to the Higher Apprenticeship Fund scheme in 2011. The reason the bid was successful was because we were able to offer significant expertise in this form of learning and the subject areas, a history of working in partnership across Higher and Further Education, and with employers, and the clear mapping of the proposals to the needs of the region.

At UWE Bristol we already have an extensive range of connections and networks with employers in our region and beyond, particularly with SMEs – who are absolutely at the heart of growth in the UK. For example, leading regional innovation networks, in Biosciences, Microelectronics, Green Technologies and the Creative Industries; and leading on one of four government funded ‘University Enterprise Zones’, in robotics, biosciences, biomedicine and other high tech areas, working with the Local Enterprise Partnership and the University of Bristol.

We already work with employers, and our own careers consultants, on the design of our academic programmes and opportunities, and have a number of programmes that are co-run with industry professionals – for example with the BBC in film making and broadcast production.

Last year we launched a new BA Business (Team Entrepreneurship), where running a real business drives the students’ learning, as they set-up and run their own team company that will earn money finding, and completing, real projects for real organisations. This has really engaged a group of highly talented students; some of whom would not have chosen to go to University based on the standard format of more traditional degrees.

We also have a very well established Work-Based Learning framework –which is of course key to Higher Apprenticeships.

All of this means we were well placed to get engaged with Higher Apprenticeships, and it also means we are clear about how this involvement feeds back into our broader strategy as a University – which of course is absolutely critical to success.

Earlier in the year the Times Higher Education ran a headline, ‘Universities risk missing out on higher apprenticeships’, with Higher Apprenticeships being a potential means ‘by which high-level skills are delivered to the workforce without any involvement by universities’.

Our belief and experience at UWE Bristol is that, as a University, we have an essential role in the development and delivery of Higher Apprenticeships. It is very important for young people that their qualifications are nationally and internationally recognized – the qualification is not an end point in itself but must open doors. Being associated with the global reputation of a trusted university is a real asset here.

Universities also have a clear role in working with Local Enterprise Partnerships and intermediaries to ensure that the learning is transferable, beyond immediate employer needs; tackling the tensions that sometimes exist, between transferable skills and learning, and those specific to the particular employer.

In Bristol, we have the second lowest participation rate in higher education in the country. Yet, our graduates from UWE Bristol achieve some of the highest rates of employment in the country. The value of higher education and high-level skills is clear. As we look at the best ways to meet the demand for high-level skills, it is critical that policy makers keep it simple and maximise the value of the current offer. Making pathways accessible and attractive, and blending approaches to learning and work, is essential if we are to address this social unjust – regionally and nationally.

My full speech, ‘The Role of Universities in Facilitating Higher Apprenticeships’ is available here.

The Entrepreneurial University

Excellent inaugural lecture last night by UWE Bristol’s Professor Dylan Jones-Evans, who I am very pleased to welcome to the University.

Dylan explored questions such as what it means to be an entrepreneurial university, what are the main barriers and how can we do more to nurture the enterprising and entrepreneurial graduates that are critical to our country’s economic growth and social development.

With the majority of new jobs being created by companies under five years old, we can see why this is so important. But this isn’t just about creating entrepreneurs – it is much bigger than that. It is about nurturing an ‘entrepreneurial mindset’. We know that graduates are entering a rapidly changing world, where technologies beyond our current imagination, are creating jobs that we have not even thought of yet. In this environment, all graduates will need to demonstrate the enterprising attributes that Dylan spoke of – such as being action-oriented, persistent, self-determined and agile.

This is a key part of UWE Bristol’s Strategy 2020 and what it means to be a UWE Bristol graduate. Making this the lived experience for all our students is a major priority for this University.

I look forward to working with Dylan, colleagues across the University, businesses and organisations as we really drive the enterprise agenda forward, from what is a very strong base. Our innovation networks have already supported over 700 SMEs, the Graduate Talent West portal provides access to our 6,000 graduates each year (led by UWE Bristol with Business West, the LEP and other universities in the region), we run one of the largest paid internship programmes in the country, and 47% of our expenditure is with SMEs (above the government’s target of 25% for the public sector).

As Dylan stressed, this isn’t about universities working on their own. It is about universities working with businesses, local and regional organisations, and policy makers to create the experiences and rich environments where ideas and innovations can flourish.

Today, I am very pleased to say we have moved a major step further, winning funding to set up one of four ‘University Enterprise Zones’ to be supported by BIS, providing a business ‘hatchery’, incubation and grow on space for businesses specialised in robotics, biosciences, biomedicine and other high tech areas. The Zone is expected to generate over 500 new jobs, and more than £50m for the local economy.  It has been developed in collaboration with the West of England Local Enterprise Partnership and the University of Bristol with strong support from South Gloucestershire Council, the University of Bath and the West of England Academic Heath Science Network. 

The world we are living in is changing a pace. Collaboration, enterprise and an ‘entrepreneurial mindset’ are essential – and right at the forefront of our thinking at UWE Bristol.

The most important investment we can make

Investment in education is the most important investment we can make.

That was one of the main messages delivered by John Cridland CBE, Director-General of the CBI, at our annual Bolland lecture this week.

He also stressed the importance of business-university collaborations, suggesting it should be natural for any business to ‘twin’ with its university, praising UWE Bristol’s achievements as an entrepreneurial university.

He was particularly impressed with the calibre of our students on our BA Business (Team Entrepreneurship) and the innovative approach we have taken, which sees students learn by setting-up and running their own team company that will earn money finding and completing real projects for real organisations. Students from the programme have already been to the Houses of Parliament twice in the last four months, invited to provide evidence to government on future leaders and entrepreneurship.

Only last month, we saw our entrepreneurial students launch a crowdfunding campaign to bring to market an innovative 3D printer accessory. OmniDynamics smashed their target on kickstarter in less than 24 hours and have attracted some serious coverage in the technology world.

We also discussed our strong engagement with the thriving SME sector in the Bristol city region, through leading regional innovation networks in key growth sectors, running our £4m innovation for growth programme, and of course through the placements, project work, internships, and the highly skilled talent pipeline our students provide. UWE Bristol already has one of the largest paid internship programmes in the higher education sector – run largely with SMEs – we offer Enterprise Internships to support our students to become the entrepreneurs of the future, and earlier this month we launched our Green Internships which will help businesses to develop green policies and practices. Many of these initiatives are thanks to our award winning Employability and Enterprise Service, which was recognised earlier this year as the best in the sector at the NUE awards.  

Our plans for the future are ambitious. Earlier this month we were one of only 20 universities in the UK to be awarded the Small Business Charter, which not only recognises the enormous amount of work we already do with small businesses in the region, but also means that we can access funds to increase our support for business growth.

But most importantly, UWE Bristol boasts one of the most impressive employment records in the higher education sector, being recognised by the Telegraph as one of the top 8 universities to go to for getting a job. That means working successfully with employers and business to widen the reach of transformational opportunities to maximise the potential of individuals, so they can realise their ambitions – as business leader, entrepreneur, practitioner and professional – which of course also brings huge benefits right across our society.